iAmsterdam
Luc Hoornaert has been active in the field of gastronomy for more than 25 years and provides rare Japanese ingredients to a broad spectrum of international chefs who are passionate about quality. His relentless search and curiosity for good and tasty food has brought him to countless places and has given him an insight into a wide range of kitchens and preparations.
December 5, 2016

Luxurious carpaccio at Le Lion Noir

Luc Hoornaert has been active in the field of gastronomy for more than 25 years and provides rare Japanese ingredients to a broad spectrum of international chefs who are passionate about quality. His relentless search and curiosity for good and tasty food has brought him to countless places and has given him an insight into a wide range of kitchens and preparations.

There is always something going on in colorful Reguliersdwarsstraat. This well-known night-life street running from Koningsplein to Rembrandtplein is mostly known for its many gay cafés.

I wonder what the inhabitants of the Reguliersklooster, a convent that from 1394 to 1532 stood right outside of what was the Regulierspoort, would have thought of this. It is a well-kept secret that there are also a few excellent restaurants on this busy street.

Le Lion Noir is one of them. It is a beautiful place with an intimate urban garden where you can sit and relax. And when you do so, you realise how quiet the Reguliersdwarsstraat can be. Le Lion Noir is therefore a nice resting place in the sometimes crazy world of this street. The classic design of the restaurant, on the second floor, confirms that food is taken very seriously here. Some elements remind me of high school, while others have a distinct colonial African flair. In any case, this interior is fascinating, just like the kitchen where Ron Dijkstra finds his inspiration in French classics, although for the ‘must eat’, he turned his attention to Italy.

What to order: Carpaccio with king bolete and duck liver

Carpaccio is a dish that seems to have been around forever. Actually, it was only created in 1950 in another magnificent city crisscrossed by countless waterways: Venice. Venetian countess Amalia Nani Mocenigo was a regular at Harry’s Bar. When her doctor told her that she suffered from anemia and should eat a lot of raw red meat, Harry’s Bar owner Giuseppe Cipriani created for her a dish made of thinly sliced raw beef, lightly marinated in olive oil and lemon juice, and finished with a dressing of house-made mayonnaise. When the countess asked him the name of the dish, he looked outside and his eye fell on a poster displaying a retrospective exhibit of the painter Vittore Carpaccio: the painting displayed on the poster contained a lot of red and yellow. ‘Carpaccio’, he replied, and a legend was born.

Must Eat Amsterdam - Lion Noir

The version served at Le Lion Noir is more luxurious because the meat is rolled up, nicely seasoned, and served with thinly sliced raw king bolete and duck liver. The combination produces a unique flavour. Bravo!

LE LION NOIR

Reguliersdwarsstraat 28

1017 BM Amsterdam

T +31 (0)20 627 6603

www.lionnoir.nl

lunch Mon.-Fri. 12.00-14.30//dinner Mon.-Sun. 18.00-22.00//bar Sun.-Thu. 18.00-01.00, Fri.-Sat. 18.00-03.00

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